Sep 29

Burnout

As I sit (let’s be honest, I am standing) here at my desk, I am having a serious brain bash because my mouth is numb from the dentist and my mind is telling me to run and go drink a tub of honey. How does this make sense? Well, when my blood sugar is super low my tongue and the side of my mouth always tingle. If you have diabetes, I am sure you can empathize. To say the least, while I am working, my eyes are glued to my continuous glucose monitor (CGM).

In a nutshell, this situation I am experiencing right now is how I have felt about my diabetes in the last month. It’s been a knee-jerk and while my blood sugars have been decent, they have been way too much freaking work to be where they are. And never in my (adult) life have I cared about what people think, or where their eyes go when I meet or greet them, but I am feeling sensitive about the fact many people directly look at my Dexcom arm, which usually has a bright purple sticker on it and my upper back where I have been recently hosting my insulin pod. Indeed I ripped my CGM off my arm last night partly because I am over this! I needed a break, and although my CGM break was short, I found myself seeking a new spot (my butt) to put my Dexcom to deal with this emotion.

What’s going on with me? I usually jump at the opportunity to educate people about what is on my arm and back…Ahhh, I am totally burned out.

My lifestyle and diabetes are not dancing very well together, and I realize I need to take a big deep breath (or 10) and figure out how to get the 2 at least on the same radio station. The best way to do this, I am finding is slowing down, breathing more and talking about it.

I have dozens of clients with diabetes and while I am providing sound recommendations I am being transparent with my current struggle and human feelings. Simply writing this post is allowing me to have a weight lifted off my shoulders and I would love for viewers to add any feedback or mentions on how they can relate in the below comment section.

I may be the @diabeticdietitian, but I am not superhuman. I want to eat or be able to not eat whenever I want, sleep however I want (often I roll onto my CGM or pod and it hurts), and not think about the carb, protein, fat breakdown of food. I can loosen my expectations for my control, but I know that will make me a cranky person, so what goes?

Instead, I am making small tweaks, setting boundaries (like turn phone to airplane mode come 9pm or really work at being present when I am with people) and reaching for broader goals. As shared, instead of chucking off my CGM for days or months (which is totally fine to do, and I have done that), I am finding more conservative spots to stick my CGM and my pod (lower back) until I want to forwardly talk about them in public. Instead of obsessing about tight control, I mapped out a plan to eat super nutritious, and more importantly, desired foods. I know what I like, I know how to bolus for some of my favorite foods, I just need to slow down, lighten my to-do list and ground myself.

Diabetes can knock us down sometimes, but it brings us opportunities and connections we would never have otherwise. As my Insta-friend @type1dchick put it best, “God gave his toughest battles to his strongest soldiers” and I will add that the diabetes community is a strong one and a great place to be.

Chin up.

Sep 28

Food Is Thy Medicine

Diabetes Sisters is hosting their Weekend for Women conference October 13-15 and I will a guest speaker presenting on my take on wellness with using food as medicine.

In summary, the food we choose to eat has an immediate impact on our blood sugar, and each day we are given the chance to assess, learn, and improve. In 25 years, I have learned and continue to learn through my blood sugar data and current research, low carb proves to be successful. But are all carbs equal? How low should we go? What unconventional wisdom is the biggest payoff to know for long-term health? With every bite of food, we are giving ourselves the chance to not only survive but thrive. Our grocery list shall be a prescription pad, and our kitchen is a pharmacy. I invite you to come and participate in learning.

Keep Reading

Aug 28

When Illness Meets Passion & Profession: My Take on Wellness

I can’t wait! Come September 14th, during the lunch hour, 12noon, at Columbus, OH JDRF (or more so 200 W Wilson Bridge Building (Worthington Industries)—conference room #132), I will be pumping the crowd with all my nutrition tactics when it comes to blood sugar control. I hope to see you there!

#foodisthymedicine #type1since1991 #nutritionadvocate #diabetesadvocate #letmehelpyou

PRESENTATION: Using Food As Medicine

The food we choose to eat has an immediate impact on our blood sugar, and each day we are given the chance to assess, learn, and improve. In 25 years, I have learned and continue to learn through my blood sugar data and current research, low carb proves to be successful. But are all carbs equal? How low should we go? What unconventional wisdom is the biggest payoff to know for long-term health? With every bite of food, we are giving ourselves the chance to not only survive but thrive. Our grocery list shall be a prescription pad, and our kitchen is a pharmacy. I invite you to come and participate in learning how to use food as medicine. Discover what type of meal is best to begin your day with for blood sugar control and hormonal balance, and how to go from there, to live a rich, energized, and sexy life.  

ABOUT: Kelly Schmidt, RD, LDN

Kelly is a Registered, Licensed Dietitian, Author and a real food wellness advocate. On Kelly’s journey, she did not initially seek out nutrition… it came to her. In 1991 she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and she quickly learned the power of, “food is thy medicine.” She has an indistinguishable passion for no-nonsense nutrition and helping people discover the healthiest version of themselves. In 2012, Kelly opened her private practice, Kelly Schmidt Wellness, where she helps hundreds of people with blood sugar control, nutrition counseling, touring grocery stores, wellness programs, speaking engagements and more.

Kelly gets it. She has had her own health struggles, including weight and nutrition confusion… after all, her childhood nickname was Stubbs! With this, she approaches each client uniquely, helping them to once again get in-tune with their body, and learn how to interpret its messages. She will be an advocate for you, and teach you how to be your own. She believes life is too short to not have the best quality of life every day.

 

Aug 17

Peach Gobbler “Sandwich”

I choose my meals based on 1) desire, 2) blood sugar control/moderating the carbohydrates in the meal, 3) foods I tolerate (use of an elimination diet and a food sensitivity test), 4) my activity level and 5) satiety. I aim to allow a meal to keep me full from one meal to the next, or 4-6 hours. On this work day, I came up with a “sandwich” that was so awesome that I had to share the details. I’ll call it the “Peach Gobbler.”

On this work day, I came up with a “sandwich” that was so awesome that I had to share the details. I’ll call it the “Peach Gobbler.” It’s packed with protein to help keep my blood sugars stable, a few healthy carbohydrates to help round out the meal, and healthy fat to keep me satiated. I have found that it’s easy to keep my blood sugars in range and steady by keeping the total grams of carbohydrates in a meal to less than 30 grams. This came to 23 grams. Nice!

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 large romaine lettuce leaves
  • 3 ounces of organic turkey deli meat
  • 1 small white peach, sliced
  • 2 ounces of goat cheese
  • 2 slices of bacon, sulfate free, turkey
  • salt, pepper, fresh cilantro and green onion to taste
  • a drizzle of raw honey

DIRECTIONS

Use 2 romaine lettuce leaves as a stand in for sliced bread.

Layer on the deli meat, goat cheese, spices/herbs, then honey, topping it all off with warm bacon and the remaining lettuce leaves.

Slice in half and enjoy.

For extra credit and nutrition add some fermented vegetables as a side and a fat-bomb for a treat!

Nutrition Details – sources include USDA

  • Total calories: 398
  • Fat: 18 grams
  • Protein: 39 grams
  • Fiber: 4 grams
  • Carbs: 23 grams

Jul 27

Treat.Your.Self.

This year, 2017, has been filled with gems. From our first family ski trip to seeing dear friends get married to finding my village in our new(ish) community and more. But this year has also involved a lot of loss. Loss of family members and people who seem like family. After returning from my husband’s hometown after saying goodbye to his childhood home mid-June, I stated, “We’ve done enough #adulting for a lifetime.” Overall with the waves of life, we need to be reminded to make each day count and to give ourselves grace.

In the last 72 hours, I have said this very statement at least twice in all my counseling sessions. We are all focused on bettering our health, and we need to be graceful with how the journey unfolds.

Wellness is far more than diet, probiotics, sleep, and exercise. It’s about being connected with ourselves and knowing that we are worthy. We are the very person we should be at this very moment and we need to stop doing and start being. Being in the sense of self-love, forgiveness, and self-acceptance.

Life is short and amazing. Each week find time to take care of yourself. It doesn’t have to be a spa day, but it has to be something more than what we are accustomed to doing.

These images were gathered from some of my Insta-friends @thebalancedbeancounter, @catharticspacecounseling & @cappellos.

Jul 12

How Much Health Affects Your Wealth

How Much Your Health Impacts Your Wealth

Via: InvestmentZen.com

Jun 22

Activated Charcoal Lemonade with Collagen Recipe

*This article was originally published on Thrivemarket.com/blog

Our take on the activated charcoal lemonade craze looks much cooler than the sludge-colored detox drinks everyone seems to be sipping lately. We froze our activated charcoal into ice cubes, creating a stark contrast when served in bright lemonade. When the ice starts to melt, it creates a cool-looking swirling effect as the charcoal mixes with the drink. To give it an extra boost, we mixed in Great Lakes Gelatin’s Collagen Hydrolysate powder. Collagen helps keep joints flexible and skin supple but because it decreases with age, it’s important to replenish with collagen-rich foods or supplements. This powder from Great Lakes has been hydrolyzed so it won’t congeal and features a unique combination of amino acids that may be beneficial for bone and joint health.

ACTIVATED CHARCOAL LEMONADE WITH COLLAGEN

Yield: 10 to 12 servings

Active Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 12 hours (freezing time included)

INGREDIENTS

For the activated charcoal ice cubes

For the collagen lemonade

INSTRUCTIONS (Youtube video here)

Make the activated charcoal ice cubes

Break charcoal capsules by cutting with scissors to add the charcoal powder to a large container. Add the water. Stir until blended. Pour the liquid into ice cube molds. Freeze for 8 hours or overnight.

Make the collagen lemonade

In large pitcher, add honey, collagen powder, and hot water; stir until honey dissolves. Add lemon juice and cold water; stir until well mixed. Fill a glass with activated charcoal ice cubes and pour lemonade over the ice. Garnish with lemon slice.

Recipe credit: Angela Gaines

Photo credit: Paul Delmont

Related Articles:

Use of Activated Charcoal 

Jun 08

Blood Sugar Friendly Fat Bombs

Keto is trending and I am enjoying the ride. I’ve always been low carb, but in the last year I have been increasing my fat and moderating my carbohydrates and protein intake. Why? I want and deserve steady blood sugar control and this way of eating is proving to work for me, and as an added bonus I am leaning out. As someone with type 1 diabetes, I have to calculate everything that goes into my mouth and marry it with insulin. It’s a challenge, some days breezier than others, but since eating a fat dominant diet and toying with intermittent fasting (usually just 13 hours overnight) it’s been even easier to go about my life without blood sugar spikes or drops getting in my way. This path isn’t for everyone, but if a ketogenic diet is something you are interested in, make blood sugar control the target and goal. Above all, listen to your body and intuition to decide if it’s fitting or not.

This month I have been whipping up the below recipe and pairing it with my lunch or dinner. It’s delicious and my toddler Declan has been asking for “coconut balls” daily. This recipe was inspired by the blogger over at Empowered Sustenance. 

KSW Fat Bombs:

INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Start with soft coconut butter. If mine is solid, I will remove the lid from the coconut butter jar and microwave it for 30 seconds.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or use a cupcake tray. I have a mini cupcake tray and they are perfect for making this recipe into bite-sized balls.
  3. In a bowl, combine the coconut butter and collagen. Add the honey.
  4. Add the coconut oil, and if you find the recipe to be too solid, feel comfortable adding another teaspoon of coconut oil.
  5. Add the vanilla and a pinch of salt.
  6. Using a spoon create small balls and place them on the baking sheet or individually in a cupcake tray. Place in the fridge for 30 minutes before eating.

 

Related Topics:

What Are Amino Acids And Why Are They Good For You?

Who Should Try the Keto Diet?

May 30

What’s the Most Important Meal of the Day?

Americans spend billions of dollars on the weight loss industry sussing the best diet to attain a lean figure when research is proving it’s not only about WHAT we eat but also WHEN we eat.

In the 1970s mealtimes were easily blurred with snacks. The average American was no longer eating breakfast at 8 am lunch at noon, (no snacks) and home for dinner by 6 pm. Modern living has wiped away the pattern to naturally intermittent fast 14 hours from breakfast to dinner, leaving a window of eating for 10 hours during the day.

Some advice even suggests eating 6 small meals a day. Why? Many think it’s to rev the metabolism. However, I argue this is not true. Another reason may be to manage the endless marketing and subconscious message that we need to fear hunger. “Hungry? Grab a Snickers,” or “Do the Dew,” better yet, “It Melts in your Mouth, Not in Your Hand.” When my dear 90-year-old grandma was a girl, I bet she had no idea what the saying “Snack Attack” meant. While the effort is there to do better, including the Grocery Manufacturing Association taking the initiative to offer healthier snacks to kids, we are all missing the message: we don’t need to eat at all hours of the day. It’s not favorable on the wallet, waistline nor hormones.

TAKEAWAYS:

  • Make eating an experience, start the day strong with a solid meal and have boundaries of giving your body the time to rest and digest.
  • The best ingredient in a meal is hunger and a meal should satiate enough to go to from one meal to the next. One caveat for this is if lunch and dinner are greater than 6 hours apart.
  • Additionally, if you are not hungry when you wake, it’s okay to defer breakfast for a few hours — but it’s not to be skipped.

What else matters with a pattern of eating? Is it better to have a large meal for dinner or earlier? Let’s follow the research by looking at a few strong studies. 

A 2013 study, including 2 groups of overweight women were randomly assigned to eat either a large breakfast or a large dinner. Both ate 1400 calories per day, with the study variable of the largest meal being breakfast or dinner. This is what the results showed:

Large breakfast group = lost far more weight than the dinner group. How? One studied lab showed the dinner group had a much larger overall rise in insulin.

Additionally, a 1992 study showed similar results. With a large meal, the insulin response was 25-50% greater in the evening. The higher the insulin response in the evening was translating into more weight gain for the dinner group. Importantly this showcases how obesity is a hormonal, not caloric, imbalance. Losing weight and maintaining a lower weight is not a calorie counting game. There is much more to it.  

TAKEAWAY:

  • Eat like a prince for breakfast, a king for lunch and a pauper for dinner.
  • If diabetic, minimalize blood sugar variation by taking insulin medication prior to meals. As a type 1, I find I need 10 minutes before breakfast, nearly 20 minutes before lunch and 15 minutes of a pre-bolus of insulin before dinner.
  • Another practice that is more well-known to satiety and health is to never eat a carbohydrate food (fruit, grains, starchy vegetable) alone. Pair a carbohydrate food with protein or fat or both to minimize any blood sugar spikes.

Next up, what is the most important meal of the day? Well, they all are important for different reasons, but it’s essential for our health to allow for time to rest and digest (don’t eat all day nor night).

Overall, breakfast shall not be skipped or be skimpy. A calorie-loaded meal at the beginning of the day pays off with hunger and hormone control, prevents snacking and cravings and can help blood sugar control and weight management. A good idea = vegetable, 3 egg omelet with coffee and a spoonful of coconut oil.

Lunch shall be valued and large. Hormonally, lunch is the best meal to have the most carbohydrates (fruit, lentils, beans, gluten free grains, and my preference and favorite, starchy vegetables) consumed. Protein is essential for blood sugar control and satiety, as is fat.

If dinner is more than 6 hours from lunch, pack a small snack; not a small meal. Choose something that is gentle on blood sugars (nuts, jerky, raw vegetables, coconut, avocado, olives) and is sufficient to retain hunger excitement for the next meal. Dinner can be a smaller version of lunch and once it is enjoyed and finished, the kitchen is closed.

TAKEAWAY:

  • Do a self-experiment and see how many hours you go from one day to the next without eating. Attempt again and this time try to have a 13-hour gap, which is reflective with the sunset to sunrise. Do you feel any different? Did you sleep any sounder? Continue to play with this until you reach a timeframe that feels intuitive and beneficial. I like using a smartphone app called Zero to help with the tracking.
IN CLOSING: 
Before one immediately makes it a goal to stop eating after dinner and adjusting meal sizes, a healthy bedtime should be in place first. Meals need to be large enough so this new pattern doesn’t lead to undereating. Remember if weight loss is a goal, successful weight loss is about balancing hormones. Eating in the evening can disrupt circadian rhythms and therefore hormones. If hunger persists at night, be sure breakfast is large enough and understand hunger comes in waves. Additionally, if omitting a snack presents a very stressful process, ease into the practice. Overall, every meal is important and so is how we eat it when we eat it.
Resources:

 

May 23

Unicorn Frappe Recipe Makeover

*This article was originally published on Thrivemarket.com/blog

If you’re a fan of the unicorn food craze—and who doesn’t get even a little excited by pretty hues, glitter, and sprinkles? We’ve got a healthy take on a beautifully blended drink that’s perfect for summer. Our recipe uses sweet strawberries to create a natural pink color, and almond milk and coconut yogurt provide added nutrients. Our secret ingredient is vanilla- and coconut-flavored Collagen Fuel, a protein powder that, in addition to providing some tropical flavor, may help support healthy joints, tendons, and muscles. Drink up!

UNICORN FRAPPE

Yield: 2 servings

Total Time: 22 minutes

INGREDIENTS

For the strawberry sauce

  • 1 pound strawberries, washed, hulled, and sliced in half
  • ¼ cup water
  • 1 teaspoon honey 

For the frappe

INSTRUCTIONS

Make the strawberry sauce

Add strawberries, water, and honey to a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 5 to 7 minutes, or until strawberries break down and liquid has thickened a bit. When cool, blend until smooth.

Make the frappe

In a blender, add Collagen Fuel, yogurt, almond milk, and bananas. Blend until smooth. Add blue food coloring (if using) and ice, then blend just until combined and ice is still slushy. In a tall glass, smear 2 tablespoons of strawberry sauce around the inside of the glass in a circular motion. Gently fill the glass with the yogurt mixture. Drink immediately.
Recipe credit: Angela Gaines

Photo credit: Paul Delmont

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